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get sick often nutritionist joel radley

Thyroid Specialists London

The thyroid is highly sensitive to the slightest alterations in your health and has an influence on hormonal function throughout the body, including the metabolism and repair of every cell.

What is the thyroid?

The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped endocrine gland that is normally located in the lower front of the neck. The thyroid’s job is to make thyroid hormone, which is secreted into the blood and then carried to every tissue in the body. Thyroid hormone helps the body use energy, stay warm and keep the brain, heart, muscles, and other organs working as they should.

The thyroid is probably the most ignored and poorly treated gland in the body. Yet it is one of the most important areas to look at to improve energy and overall health.

Causes & Etiology

When the thyroid is not functioning properly, a chain reaction of hormonal events takes place that involves several glands and hormones of the endocrine system and the bodily systems they regulate. The end result is one of two primary types of health conditions: hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism.

Hormones produced by the thyroid

The thyroid produces two major hormones: triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4).

  • Thyroxine or T4 is produced by the thyroid gland under regulation from the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. The feedback loop signals to the hypothalamus to release thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), which then stimulates the pituitary gland to release the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). The 4 stands for 4 iodine molecules that are attached to it. To activate T4 it is converted to T3. We have enzymes that remove one of the iodine molecules and make T3.
  • T3 is a second thyroid hormone that is produced by the thyroid gland, but also in other tissues through deiodination (enzymatic conversion) of T4. T3 helps maintain muscle control, brain function and development, heart and digestive functions. It also plays a role in the body’s metabolic rate and the maintenance of bone health.

Although these are the two main hormones produced by the thyroid, when investigating the health and function of the thyroid gland at your GP surgery or hospital, your doctor would normally test one (possibly two)  hormone, called TSH,  to diagnose thyroid dysfunction. At our clinic we take a system wide approach to identify the root cause of disease and will run a more comprehensive panel to get a better picture of the function of your thyroid. Find out more on how we test for thyroid disease here.

Causes of thyroid problems

In order to successfully treat conditions that are directly linked to the thyroid, we need to understand what triggers the cascade of dysfunction. Only then can we begin to mitigate these triggers to start a path to healing.

Stress

Stress has a significant impact on your thyroid hormone function. This may be due to the effect of cortisol, which can block the conversion of T4 to the active thyroid hormone T3 and can also increase the unusable reverse T3 (rT3), further confusing the delicate balance of thyroid hormones that are so essential for optimal health.

Food intolerances

If you are predisposed to an autoimmune condition, certain foods can cause your immune system to overreact. Specific foods such as grains, gluten, soy, and dairy can contribute [1] to inflammation which can further perpetuate symptoms and autoimmune flare-ups.

We run comprehensive food intolerance panels to help you determine which foods are an issue for you.

Nutrient deficiencies

Your body relies on a certain amount of specific nutrients for your immune system to function optimally. Deficiencies in selenium [2] and vitamin D [3] have been linked to poor immune function in people with autoimmune thyroid conditions.

At the London Clinic of Nutrition, we can investigate if nutrient deficiencies could be part of your underlying health problems.

Gut problems

Close to 80% of your immune system is located in your gut microbiome. Research suggests that poor gut health such as leaky gut syndrome and dysbiosis will contribute [4] to poor immune health. Also, 20 percent of your T4 is converted to the active thyroid hormone T3 in the gut, and an imbalanced, unhealthy microbiome can inhibit this process.

Gut health testing can determine your level of gut dysfunction to see if this is a factor in your case. In almost all cases, we will investigate our patients’ gut health during their appointment.

Toxin exposure

This is becoming more and more prevalent as our world has become increasingly toxic. Studies have shown that chemicals and heavy metals can cause an autoimmune response [5] against the thyroid.

At our specialist clinic in London, we use a range of tests to measure your toxicity levels through labs such as a urine heavy metal panel.

Infection 

Bacterial and viral infections are associated [6] with just about every autoimmune condition. This could be due to the fact that the majority of our immune system is produced from the gut microbiome, so when infections enter the gut, they can alter immune activity.

Iodine levels

While iodine is necessary to make thyroid hormones, excess amounts can actually exacerbate a thyroid condition called Hashimoto’s [7].

Other possible causes may include oestrogen imbalances, blood sugar dysregulation, insulin resistance and diabetes, use of artificial sweeteners, smoking, too much goitrogens and low levels of vitamin A, iron, copper.

These conditions can have many causes and triggers such as:

  • Dehydration
  • Food intolerances
  • Poor assimilation 
  • Poor elimination 
  • Traumatic events
  • Essential fatty acid deficiencies
  • Liver congestion

Signs and Symptoms

Symptoms of Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism stems from an underproduction of thyroid hormones. The signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism vary from person to person. The severity of the condition also affects which signs and symptoms appear and when. Because many of the symptoms are so common and linked with other diseases, they can be difficult to identify.

The most common signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism include: 

  • Thinning hair or hair loss 
  • Puffy and sensitive face 
  • Depression 
  • Constipation 
  • High cholesterol 
  • Oedema 
  • Fatigue 
  • Mental fogginess and poor memory
  • Poor vision 
  • Weight gain
  • Poor circulation and numbness in the hands and feet
  • Feeling cold
  • Chronic digestive problems 
  • Dry/brittle hair and skin 
  • Morning headaches
  • Muscle stiffness, aches and tenderness 
  • Fertility difficulties and menstrual changes
  • Hoarseness 
  • Decreased sweating

Causes & Etiology

When the thyroid is not functioning properly, a chain reaction of hormonal events takes place that involves several glands and hormones of the endocrine system and the bodily systems they regulate. The end result is one of two primary types of health conditions: hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism.

Hormones produced by the thyroid

The thyroid produces two major hormones: triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4).

  • Thyroxine or T4 is produced by the thyroid gland under regulation from the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. The feedback loop signals to the hypothalamus to release thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), which then stimulates the pituitary gland to release the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). The 4 stands for 4 iodine molecules that are attached to it. To activate T4 it is converted to T3. We have enzymes that remove one of the iodine molecules and make T3.
  • T3 is a second thyroid hormone that is produced by the thyroid gland, but also in other tissues through deiodination (enzymatic conversion) of T4. T3 helps maintain muscle control, brain function and development, heart and digestive functions. It also plays a role in the body’s metabolic rate and the maintenance of bone health.

Although these are the two main hormones produced by the thyroid, when investigating the health and function of the thyroid gland at your GP surgery or hospital, your doctor would normally test one (possibly two)  hormone, called TSH,  to diagnose thyroid dysfunction. At our clinic we take a system wide approach to identify the root cause of disease and will run a more comprehensive panel to get a better picture of the function of your thyroid. Find out more on how we test for thyroid disease here.

Causes of thyroid problems

In order to successfully treat conditions that are directly linked to the thyroid, we need to understand what triggers the cascade of dysfunction. Only then can we begin to mitigate these triggers to start a path to healing.

Stress

Stress has a significant impact on your thyroid hormone function. This may be due to the effect of cortisol, which can block the conversion of T4 to the active thyroid hormone T3 and can also increase the unusable reverse T3 (rT3), further confusing the delicate balance of thyroid hormones that are so essential for optimal health.

Food intolerances

If you are predisposed to an autoimmune condition, certain foods can cause your immune system to overreact. Specific foods such as grains, gluten, soy, and dairy can contribute [1] to inflammation which can further perpetuate symptoms and autoimmune flare-ups.

We run comprehensive food intolerance panels to help you determine which foods are an issue for you.

Nutrient deficiencies

Your body relies on a certain amount of specific nutrients for your immune system to function optimally. Deficiencies in selenium [2] and vitamin D [3] have been linked to poor immune function in people with autoimmune thyroid conditions.

At the London Clinic of Nutrition, we can investigate if nutrient deficiencies could be part of your underlying health problems.

Gut problems

Close to 80% of your immune system is located in your gut microbiome. Research suggests that poor gut health such as leaky gut syndrome and dysbiosis will contribute [4] to poor immune health. Also, 20 percent of your T4 is converted to the active thyroid hormone T3 in the gut, and an imbalanced, unhealthy microbiome can inhibit this process.

Gut health testing can determine your level of gut dysfunction to see if this is a factor in your case. In almost all cases, we will investigate our patients’ gut health during their appointment.

Toxin exposure

This is becoming more and more prevalent as our world has become increasingly toxic. Studies have shown that chemicals and heavy metals can cause an autoimmune response [5] against the thyroid.

At our specialist clinic in London, we use a range of tests to measure your toxicity levels through labs such as a urine heavy metal panel.

Infection 

Bacterial and viral infections are associated [6] with just about every autoimmune condition. This could be due to the fact that the majority of our immune system is produced from the gut microbiome, so when infections enter the gut, they can alter immune activity.

Iodine levels

While iodine is necessary to make thyroid hormones, excess amounts can actually exacerbate a thyroid condition called Hashimoto’s [7].

Other possible causes may include oestrogen imbalances, blood sugar dysregulation, insulin resistance and diabetes, use of artificial sweeteners, smoking, too much goitrogens and low levels of vitamin A, iron, copper.

These conditions can have many causes and triggers such as:

  • Dehydration
  • Food intolerances
  • Poor assimilation 
  • Poor elimination 
  • Traumatic events
  • Essential fatty acid deficiencies
  • Liver congestion

Treatments

Who specialises in the thyroid problems?

Here at the London Clinic of Nutrition, our functional medicine approach aims to help patients to address the root cause of thyroid disease.

A comprehensive panel including free T3, free T4, TSH, total T4, total T3, thyroid antibodies and T3 uptake will be required , alongside adrenal hormone testing and iodine loading. We also use the Barnes Temperature Test to measure the auxiliary temperature of the underarms first thing in the morning five days in a row.
When we look at thyroid function, with functional medicine in mind, we would consider the following key factors:

  • Factors that inhibit proper production of thyroid hormones: stress, infection, trauma, radiation, medication, fluoride (antagonist to iodine), toxins such as pesticides, mercury, cadmium, lead; autoimmune disease (celiac).
  • Factors that increase conversion of T4 to RT3: stress, trauma, low calorie diet, inflammation, toxins, infections, liver and kidney dysfunction and medications.
  • Factors that contribute to proper production of thyroid hormones: Vitamin E, B2, B3, B6 and C, iron, iodine, zinc and selenium, tyrosine.
  • Factors that can increase the conversion of T4 (non-active) to T3 (active thyroid hormone): Selenium and zinc.
  • Factors that improve cellular sensitivity to thyroid hormones: Vitamin A, zinc and exercise.

Considering how multifactorial and complex thyroid disease is, we may use additional tests that involve immune markers, toxicity panels and different hormones to get a clear representation of your health.  Once the tests have been processed, you will receive a personalised treatment plan tailored to you, your lifestyle and your body’s needs.

Our top priority is to address the root cause of your health challenges. By focusing on the foundation of your imbalance, we’ll be able to ease your symptoms and support the healing process, which will steadily bring your body into balance.

How much is a private thyroid consultation?

We offer a range of consultations and packages for clients depending on the level of support required. Get in touch with a member of the team today or schedule a complimentary discovery call to discuss your health concerns and be best matched with a thyroid specialist practitioner.


What are the thyroid hormones needed for?

It regulates the metabolism, hence if sluggish you will be tired, tend to gain weight, be anaemic and loose hair. This is seen in my practice often. The soy food craze has not helped this situation as it messes with the thyroid. The Thyroid hormone is in fact required by the entire-body for the production of energy too. Yes the mitochondria health is key n a cellular level but with poor thyroid function it is no good. As previously mentioned thyroid hormones contribute to other hormone health. If out of balance it can lead to blood sugar dysregulation, cardiovascular disease, weight gain, sex hormone dysfunction, fatigue, mental health issues and ultimately unhappiness.

What does it mean to have a thyroid condition?

Thyroid conditions are characterised by when the thyroid gland is working at a sub-optimal level which results in a cascade of hormonal imbalances affecting glands and hormones of the endocrine system, which impacts the physiological processes that are tightly regulated by this axis. This can be underactive (hypothyroidism) or over-active (hyper-thyroidism).

This is a complex condition or dis-ease. Lets discuss the differences between the two most common forms of thyroid disorders as well as what we will take into account when treating the thyroid at our Harley street clinic of nutrition and nutritional therapy.

What Is Hypothyroidism?

According to the NHS in the UK an under-active thyroid when the thyroid gland doe snot make enough thyroid hormones to meet the bodies requirements. Yet unfortunately the sub-clinical disease often goes undiagnosed for many years until its more severe.

Symptoms of underactive thyroid

  • Weight gain
  • Constipation
  • Mental fogginess and poor memory
  • Fatigue
  • Poor circulation and numbness in the hands and feet
  • Thinning hair or hair loss 
  • Puffy and sensitive face 
  • Depression 
  • High cholesterol 
  • Oedema 
  • Poor vision 
  • Feeling cold
  • Chronic digestive problems 
  • Dry/brittle hair and skin 
  • Morning headaches
  • Muscle stiffness, aches and tenderness 
  • Infertility and changes in menstrual cycle
  • Hoarseness 
  • Decreased sweating

Causes

The two major causes of hypothyroidism are:

1. Nutrient deficiency

  • Iodine. Thyroid hormone is rich in iodine, and deficiency of iodine can lead to hypothyroidism.
  • Zinc is required for the synthesis of thyroid hormone, and deficiency of zinc has been shown to result in hypothyroidism. 
  • Selenium, is required to convert T4 (inactive thyroid hormone) into T3 (active form of thyroid hormone). 

2. Hashimoto’s disease 

In Hashimoto’s disease, the body attacks the thyroid gland, progressively destroying its capacity to produce thyroid hormone and resulting in hypothyroidism.

Pregnancy

The reason isn’t clear, but sometimes, inflammation of the thyroid occurs after pregnancy. This is called postpartum thyroiditis. Women with this condition usually have a severe increase in thyroid hormone levels followed by a sharp drop in thyroid hormone production. Most women with postpartum thyroiditis will regain their normal thyroid function but some may end up developing hypothyroidism. 

How to detect thyroid abnormalities?

The conventional test on the NHS only looks at one to two markers of thyroid health which is outdated. They only look at TSH and T4. This is far too myopic leading to a plethora of under or mismdiagnosis. Patients then leave the surgery with puffy faces, fatigue and thinning hair, or racing heart rate and excessive urination.

A full thyroid screening is the most cutting-edge way to go about things thyroid. This prevents any setbacks and allows us to make the most of early signs as —- Early identification of thyroid malfunction or antibodies towards the thyroid gland may give us an opportunity to prevent the need for eventual Thyroid hormone replacement. For patients with inadequate thyroid function, functional medicine helps to optimise hormone levels with a holistic treatment plan including diet, nutritional support, stress reduction and appropriate hormonal replacement therapy where needed.

Given its importance, we offer full thyroid screening to all of our patients, to ensure we are not missing an opportunity to restore health and function to this vital organ. Although you may have had previous NHS thyroid levels and been told they are ‘normal’, our aim is for optimal health and our new patient screen includes:

  • Total and Free Thyroxine (T4)
  • Triiodothyronine (Free T3)
  • Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH)
  • Reverse T3
  • Anti-Thyroglobulin and Anti-Thyroid Peroxidase antibodies

This panel allows us to identify patients with early thyroid autoimmune disease (who may not yet be symptomatic), and to identify and treat the cause of many cases of fatigue and other health problems. We are seeing increasing numbers of patients who have problems with thyroid hormone metabolism. These may not be identified by the standard NHS screening panels. Our tests enable us to identify patients who are not able to process Thyroxine (the standard replacement hormone), normally.

Look at your hands

Weak and brittle nails with ragged cuticles are common physical signs of hypothyroidism. If you have these symptoms and also suffer with fatigue, hair loss (especially a thinning of the lateral eyebrows), low libido, dry skin, and unexplainable weight gain, it is possible that you have hypothyroidism.  

Risk factors

The thyroid is the ‘sentinel’ for the environment. The function of the thyroid gland is designed to be induced or suppressed in response to changes in the environment. As the environment changes, the function of the thyroid gland will change.

From the functional medicine perspective, we consider 8 environmental domains as key risk factors in the development of hypothyroidism:

  • Infections: Viral infections such as Epstein-barr can be a potential trigger for poor thyroid health, so an important consideration whilst investigating thyroid health.
  • We often investigate if toxins, particularly heavy metals, play a part as they seem to be key triggers in the development in hypothyroidism [3].
  • Adrenal stress is probably the most common problem we encounter in functional medicine and the thyroid is no exception. Adrenal stress can manifest in many ways, leading to autoimmunity, thyroid resistance, reduced conversion of T4 (non-active) to T3 (active) and disruption to the endocrine system [4]. 
  • Antigens/Gut function: Poor gut health can suppress thyroid function and trigger Hashimoto’s disease, and low thyroid function can lead to an inflamed and leaky gut. It’s important to mention gluten sensitivity and celiac here, as research shows a strong link between hypothyroidism and gluten intolerance [5] [6]. 
  • Nutrition: For a healthy thyroid, the most crucial nutrients include Iodine, Selenium, Zinc, and vitamin A, B, C, and tyrosine [7] [8]. Deficiencies of these nutrients can lead to the development of hypothyroidism. 
  • Medication: Thyroid physiology is very vulnerable to negative influences from many commonly prescribed and widely used medications. 
  • Movement, sleep and relationships are also huge part of the functioning of the body and we cannot ignore the power of these lifestyle factors when investigating and treating hypothyroidism

Complications

In the current conventional system, when a patient is diagnosed with hypothyroidism they are often prescribed levothyroxine to counteract the symptoms of low thyroid hormone, regardless of the cause. But is it likely that that patient will go on to develop other health conditions because the underlying cause has not been addressed? Patients with underactive thyroid function have a much higher prevalence of obesity, diabetes, osteoarthrosis, osteoporosis, asthma, hypertension, dyslipidemia, infertility, mental health issues; low thyroid function is a symptom among a collection of other related symptoms with an underlying and unifying connection [9] [10] [11]. The role of functional medicine is to investigate and address that connection, while the medication manages the symptoms.

Hypothyroidism Treatment

When we are confronted with sub-optimal or blatant thyroid dysfunction in our clinic, we must always ask two questions:

  1. What is happening upstream that is disrupting thyroid function?
  2. What else is going wrong in the body as a result of poor thyroid function? 

Simply identifying poor thyroid health and giving the same old nutrients, herbs or hormones to ‘support’ the thyroid gland itself is inadequate in both approach and understanding. At the , we take a functional medicine approach to assessing your thyroid health. Our approach is always personalised and keeps the patient’s specific needs and lifestyle in mind.

Diet

After a thorough assessment into your health and lifestyle, our dietary program focused on improving thyroid function would include the following:

  • High in pre and probiotic foods to address dysbiosis [12]
  • High in phytonutrients; think about eating for a rainbow.
  • Low in the Omega-6 and high on Omega-3 [13]
  • Low in saturated and trans fats
  • Eating organic produce as much as possible to reduce toxin exposure is always recommended.

Foods to avoid

At our clinic, we often find that eliminating some of the potentially problematic foods may be necessary. 

  • Patients with hypothyroidism often find a significant improvement in their symptoms by fully eliminating gluten from their diet. 
  • Goitrogens and soya may also be problematic for individuals with low thyroid function. 

Can you still lose weight if you have underactive thyroid?

In short, possibly. But as hypothyroidism is so multifactorial and is caused by a myriad of environmental factors (and also causes systemic complications) it totally depends on the individual.

ABOUT THE THYROID

What is the thyroid?

The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped endocrine gland that is normally located in the lower front of the neck. The thyroid’s job is to make thyroid hormone, which is secreted into the blood and then carried to every tissue in the body. Thyroid hormone helps the body use energy, stay warm and keep the brain, heart, muscles, and other organs working as they should. The thyroid is probably the most ignored and poorly treated gland in the body. Yet it is one of the most important areas to look at to improve energy and overall health. When the thyroid is not functioning properly, a chain reaction of hormonal events takes place that involves several glands and hormones of the endocrine system and the bodily systems they regulate. The end result is one of two primary types of health conditions: hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism.

Hormones produced by the thyroid

The thyroid produces two major hormones: triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4).
  • Thyroxine or T4 is produced by the thyroid gland under regulation from the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. The feedback loop signals to the hypothalamus to release thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), which then stimulates the pituitary gland to release the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). The 4 stands for 4 iodine molecules that are attached to it. To activate T4 it is converted to T3. We have enzymes that remove one of the iodine molecules and make T3.
  • T3 is a second thyroid hormone that is produced by the thyroid gland, but also in other tissues through deiodination (enzymatic conversion) of T4. T3 helps maintain muscle control, brain function and development, heart and digestive functions. It also plays a role in the body’s metabolic rate and the maintenance of bone health.
Although these are the two main hormones produced by the thyroid, when investigating the health and function of the thyroid gland at your GP surgery or hospital, your doctor would normally test one (possibly two)  hormone, called TSH,  to diagnose thyroid dysfunction. At our clinic we take a system wide approach to identify the root cause of disease and will run a more comprehensive panel to get a better picture of the function of your thyroid. Find out more on how we test for thyroid disease here.

Causes of thyroid problems

In order to successfully treat conditions that are directly linked to the thyroid, we need to understand what triggers the cascade of dysfunction. Only then can we begin to mitigate these triggers to start a path to healing. Stress Stress has a significant impact on your thyroid hormone function. This may be due to the effect of cortisol, which can block the conversion of T4 to the active thyroid hormone T3 and can also increase the unusable reverse T3 (rT3), further confusing the delicate balance of thyroid hormones that are so essential for optimal health. Food intolerances If you are predisposed to an autoimmune condition, certain foods can cause your immune system to overreact. Specific foods such as grains, gluten, soy, and dairy can contribute [1] to inflammation which can further perpetuate symptoms and autoimmune flare-ups. We run comprehensive food intolerance panels to help you determine which foods are an issue for you. Nutrient deficiencies Your body relies on a certain amount of specific nutrients for your immune system to function optimally. Deficiencies in selenium [2] and vitamin D [3] have been linked to poor immune function in people with autoimmune thyroid conditions. At the London Clinic of Nutrition, we can investigate if nutrient deficiencies could be part of your underlying health problems. Gut problems Close to 80% of your immune system is located in your gut microbiome. Research suggests that poor gut health such as leaky gut syndrome and dysbiosis will contribute [4] to poor immune health. Also, 20 percent of your T4 is converted to the active thyroid hormone T3 in the gut, and an imbalanced, unhealthy microbiome can inhibit this process. Gut health testing can determine your level of gut dysfunction to see if this is a factor in your case. In almost all cases, we will investigate our patients’ gut health during their appointment. Toxin exposure This is becoming more and more prevalent as our world has become increasingly toxic. Studies have shown that chemicals and heavy metals can cause an autoimmune response [5] against the thyroid. At our specialist clinic in London, we use a range of tests to measure your toxicity levels through labs such as a urine heavy metal panel. Infection  Bacterial and viral infections are associated [6] with just about every autoimmune condition. This could be due to the fact that the majority of our immune system is produced from the gut microbiome, so when infections enter the gut, they can alter immune activity. Iodine levels While iodine is necessary to make thyroid hormones, excess amounts can actually exacerbate a thyroid condition called Hashimoto’s [7]. Other possible causes may include oestrogen imbalances, blood sugar dysregulation, insulin resistance and diabetes, use of artificial sweeteners, smoking, too much goitrogens and low levels of vitamin A, iron, copper.

Symptoms

Symptoms of Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism stems from an underproduction of thyroid hormones. The signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism vary from person to person. The severity of the condition also affects which signs and symptoms appear and when. Because many of the symptoms are so common and linked with other diseases, they can be difficult to identify.

The most common signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism include: 

  • Thinning hair or hair loss 
  • Puffy and sensitive face 
  • Depression 
  • Constipation 
  • High cholesterol 
  • Oedema 
  • Fatigue 
  • Mental fogginess and poor memory
  • Poor vision 
  • Weight gain
  • Poor circulation and numbness in the hands and feet
  • Feeling cold
  • Chronic digestive problems 
  • Dry/brittle hair and skin 
  • Morning headaches
  • Muscle stiffness, aches and tenderness 
  • Fertility difficulties and menstrual changes
  • Hoarseness 
  • Decreased sweating

As the biggest functional medicine clinic in London, we have specialists in the field of endocrinology. 

Our experienced practitioners would always look beyond the symptoms and work upstream to find the root cause.

If indicated, we will implement an extremely useful tool called ‘aggressive case finding’ which allows us to recognise early disease state for patients with genetic and lifestyle predisposition of thyroid disease: 

 

  • Autoimmune disease, such as type 1 diabetes. 
  • Pernicious anaemia. 
  • First-degree relative with autoimmune thyroid disease.
  • History of neck radiation to the thyroid gland including radioactive iodine therapy for hyperthyroidism and external beam radiotherapy for head and neck malignancies. 
  • Prior history of thyroid surgery or dysfunction. 
  • Abnormal thyroid examination.
  • Psychiatric disorders.
  • Patients taking amiodarone or lithium.

Treatments

Who specialises in the thyroid problems?

Here at the London Clinic of Nutrition, our functional medicine approach aims to help patients to address the root cause of thyroid disease.

A comprehensive panel including free T3, free T4, TSH, total T4, total T3, thyroid antibodies and T3 uptake will be required , alongside adrenal hormone testing and iodine loading. We also use the Barnes Temperature Test to measure the auxiliary temperature of the underarms first thing in the morning five days in a row.

When we look at thyroid function, with functional medicine in mind, we would consider the following key factors:

  • Factors that inhibit proper production of thyroid hormones: stress, infection, trauma, radiation, medication, fluoride (antagonist to iodine), toxins such as pesticides, mercury, cadmium, lead; autoimmune disease (celiac).

 

  • Factors that increase conversion of T4 to RT3: stress, trauma, low calorie diet, inflammation, toxins, infections, liver and kidney dysfunction and medications.

 

  • Factors that contribute to proper production of thyroid hormones: Vitamin E, B2, B3, B6 and C, iron, iodine, zinc and selenium, tyrosine.

 

  • Factors that can increase the conversion of T4 (non-active) to T3 (active thyroid hormone): Selenium and zinc.

 

  • Factors that improve cellular sensitivity to thyroid hormones: Vitamin A, zinc and exercise. 

 

Considering how multifactorial and complex thyroid disease is, we may use additional tests that involve immune markers, toxicity panels and different hormones to get a clear representation of your health.  Once the tests have been processed, you will receive a personalised treatment plan tailored to you, your lifestyle and your body’s needs.

 

Our top priority is to address the root cause of your health challenges. By focusing on the foundation of your imbalance, we’ll be able to ease your symptoms and support the healing process, which will steadily bring your body into balance.

 

How much is a private thyroid consultation? 

 

We offer a range of consultations and packages for clients depending on the level of support required. Get in touch with a member of the team today or schedule a complimentary discovery call to discuss your health concerns and be best matched with a thyroid specialist practitioner.

 

Our thyroid reviews

You can read a selection of reviews from our thyroid clients below.